Monthly Archives: July 2016

Fooled by a Sign

(Credit: geralt/Pixabay) Percentages can be deceptive and misleading Do you remember learning about fractions at school? You had only just kind of mastered working with whole numbers, when they got broken up, and the intuitive rules simply didn’t work anymore. … Continue reading

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Did emotions kill economic man?

‘Emotional’ is not the opposite of ‘rational’ It may not strictly be considered the same as ‘irrational’, but the term ‘emotional’ is often regarded as diametrically opposed to ‘rational’. Perhaps dividing people in ‘emotional’ and ‘rational’ types would be all … Continue reading

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Does Altruism exist?

(Not in the way that is generally assumed) Mainstream economics tends to get a bad press. One reason is that many people see the dismal science using a deeply flawed model of human behaviour, the so-called homo economicus (a wholly … Continue reading

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The problem with principles

Making decisions can be tough – and if principles are involved, prepare for the impossible. For anyone with an interest in behaviour and decision making, Brexit is the gift that keeps on giving study material. After a wild couple of weeks since … Continue reading

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The Myth of the Irrational Voter

In 2007 Bryan Caplan, a professor of economics at George Mason University, published a fine book entitled ‘The Myth of the Rational Voter’. In it, he robustly questions the ability of the average voting citizen to make reasoned choices, especially … Continue reading

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