Monthly Archives: July 2019

A little (trivial) knowledge…

How come we are so easily influenced by factoids about people, no matter how inconsequential and irrelevant they are? Here’s a riddle. A man and his son go for a drive, and they are in a terrible accident, in which … Continue reading

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But does it change behaviour?

Some interventions are so obvious that they don’t need justifying. Or do they? Your correspondent only drives intermittently, and then mostly on motorways. That does not make for the most riveting journeys, but one advantage of highway driving is that … Continue reading

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More compensation!

(featured image credit: Gerd Altmann) Would the world be a better place if we found (and made) it easier to compensate others? It’s a beautiful Saturday and you’re invited to a barbecue. The hosts have a reputation for ensuring memorable … Continue reading

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Too much perseverance

(credit: Martin Deutsch CC BY) Does our tendency to keep going work in our favour? “I’ve started so I’ll finish” is one of the first catchphrases that stuck in my mind when we moved to the UK many years ago. … Continue reading

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