Category Archives: Ethics

More than cheap talk

(featured image via DALL·E) Actions speak louder than words, but one thing can make them speak even louder Much of the spectacle of the soccer world championship that is taking place in Qatar as I write (and presumably also as … Continue reading

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Apples and oranges – Part I: what is wrong with utilitarianism, anyway?

<featured image: <apples and oranges.jpg> via DALL·E) Utilitarianism is a philosophy to guide the choices we make, in which these should be judged on their consequences, against a requirement of maximizing happiness and well-being (or minimizing harm) for all affected … Continue reading

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The ‘how’ and the ‘what’ of Effective Altruism (and of good decision making)

(Featured image: Tumisu/Pixabay) Good decision making is more about the “making” than about the “decision” Altruism is an intriguing phenomenon. Many of us make material sacrifices in money, effort or time that benefit others, without a clear immediate material benefit … Continue reading

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There is more to behaviour than behaviour

(Featured image: Tobi Gaulke/Flicker CC BY NC ND 2.0) Pretty much all our problems are behavioural…but does that mean the solutions are? Could it be that very problem humans face, individually or collectively, is a behavioural problem? It sounds a … Continue reading

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Morals on the scales

featured image: Bru-nO/Pixabay Does our morality have roots in an economic phenomenon? Imagine you’re back in elementary school. It’s the birthday of one of the kids in your class – the kid who has been pestering your little brother for … Continue reading

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Something uniquely human

There are not many things that are exclusively associated with the human species, but I think I may have found one: the technicality While we have no problem distinguishing a goldfinch from a blue whale, or a mosquito from a … Continue reading

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Choosing, right and wrong

Our sense of what is right and what is wrong has more power over us than we might imagine Many of the decisions and choices we make are utilitarian in nature. When we buy something, even something inexpensive where we … Continue reading

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Rules in the balance

Even when our choices are determined by rules and principles, we cannot avoid making trade-offs Next week, Gallup, a consulting firm historically known as an opinion pollster, organizes a webinar titled Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: How to Make it a … Continue reading

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A nudger’s paradox

(featured image: Alan Geraghty/Flickr – CC BY ND 2.0) Trying to influence people’s behaviour ethically can get complicated – but it doesn’t have to When Richard Thaler, one of the most famous behavioural scientists, was once asked how he would … Continue reading

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Inflationary ethics

(featured image: De’Nick’nise/Flickr CC BY NC ND 2.0) A remarkable tale of a zero-sum that is not a zero-sum illustrates how many of our choices have an ethical dimension we are unaware of Inflation is at eye-watering levels. An entire … Continue reading

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