Monthly Archives: November 2017

Choices in the rear view mirror

(featured image credit: Fred Langridge) A bad experience may look very different when it’s behind you. How bizarre! Imagine a multi-day public transport strike is called for next week. You can’t take time off, or work from home, and it’ll totally … Continue reading

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Inescapable philosophy?

(featured image credit: Thor Edvardsen) Do we need philosophy to fully understand and explain our behaviour? (I am going to make a quick assumption here about your honesty.) How come you never engage in something like shoplifting? Surely doing so is … Continue reading

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Social norms and sexual misconduct

(featured image credit: geralt) If how we behave is motivated and moderated by what is socially desirable and acceptable, how can this be squared with the unending stream of allegations of inappropriate behaviour? Social norms influence how we make choices. … Continue reading

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Is it our business?

(Image credit: stevepb) Sometimes characteristics of products or services, or of those who sell them, immaterial as they are, can greatly influence our willingness to pay. Should they be any of our business? 500 years ago, on 31 October 1517, Martin … Continue reading

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