Monthly Archives: October 2019

Brexit, a multitude of decision-making case studies

Whether you think Brexit is a good thing or a bad thing, the process so far is a catalogue of spectacularly poor decisions. What can we learn from them? “Life is journey, not a destination”, a widely misattributed quote goes. … Continue reading

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A little more perspective, a little more understanding

(featured image via Pixabay) Numbers appear to give precision, but they are often meaningless without a suitable context “It never rains in Southern California”, the song by Albert Hammond goes. This is untrue – the average annual rainfall over the … Continue reading

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The devil’s advocate and the steel man

Two ways to challenge your thinking and grow a bit wiser Imagine you need to buy a new car. The three previous ones have all been from the same make – perhaps you had been aware of its reputation and … Continue reading

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Two sides of Subsidy

(featured image: Jannis CC BY) There is more to subsidies than meets the eye Somewhere in Worcestershire in the British Midlands, a woman pops into the local pharmacy with a doctor’s prescription for two drugs. She pays £18 (€20, $22), … Continue reading

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