Category Archives: Cognitive biases and fallacies

A voter’s burden

(featured image: carnagenyc) Voting, like so many things in life, is about the difficult task of weighing up many, often conflicting options. Maybe a (behavioural) economics perspective can help cut through it? On 18 April, Prime Minister Theresa May called a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Behavioural economics, politics, Cognitive biases and fallacies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The anti-nudge

(Featured image: Publicdomainpictures) Politicians’ love of behavioural insights is quickly forgotten if votes can be bought with populist measures When elections are imminent, talk is cheap, and cheaper still are politicians’ promises. Sure, there is little doubt that British Prime … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, Economics, politics | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Too much commitment is bad news

Featured image via ytimg.com What can go wrong when tenacity goes too far People who keep going in the face of adversity speak to our emotions and our imagination like few other things do. Inspirational books are often written by (or … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, Emotions | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The dark side of nudging?

(featured image: socialneuron) Are companies like Uber really into nudging for evil? In a recent New York Times article, the maverick taxi company Uber came under fire for “pulling psychological levers” to influence when and where their drivers work. A company … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, Economics, Ethics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Big Yellow Taxi Fallacy

(featured image: FHG Photo cc2.0) Could there be such a thing as the sunk benefit fallacy alongside the sunk cost one? Wednesday 29 March 2017 was a day of celebration for some, and a day of deep sadness for others. … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, politics, Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment

Keeping behavioural science on the straight and narrow

As we see behavioural science being applied all around us, we are left with more questions than answers Behavioural science has well and truly left obscurity and entered the mainstream. Governments – if they haven’t already done so – are … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, Ethics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The largest anchor ever

(Featured image: clmper) How do we know what is a reasonable amount of money to pay? How much would a rational person be prepared to pay for, say, a cauliflower? They’d go down the ranking of all possible purchases, and for … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioural economics, Cognitive biases and fallacies, Economics | Tagged , , | 1 Comment