Category Archives: politics

Pernicious zero-sum thinking

(featured image credit: Jason Rowe) The assumption that buyers are losers and sellers are winners is a hardy perennial, and risks making us all into losers Here is a puzzle (it’s based on an old one, as you can tell … Continue reading

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Nationalization or privatization?

(featured image credit: Krahsman) Do private and public organizations (and their employees) make inherently different trade-offs? Todd Dewey is on his way from Winnipeg, Canada to North Spirit Lake, 500 km to the north east. He is one of the … Continue reading

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Dissonance in human nature

How do we resolve the inevitable perceived contradictions in the traits of the people around us? In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey relates how he was riding on the New York subway one Sunday morning. The … Continue reading

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Democracy’s feet of clay

Do people make good choices when they vote? *Can* they? How come most of us, most of the time, don’t do crazy things? We make hundreds of decisions every day – lots of small ones, and once in a while … Continue reading

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A cocktail of biases

(featured image: delo) Jumping to conclusions – the easiest kind of exercise, especially on a Sunday morning I learned three things this week: two things I didn’t know, and one thing I did know, but regularly seem to forget. All of … Continue reading

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Shaping our reality

(Featured image credit: Free-Photos) Is there an objective reality, and are we capable of observing it? On the day after Donald Trump officially became the US president, the then White House press secretary stated the crowd “was the largest audience ever … Continue reading

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What do we want? Control!

(image credit: Sarah Ross/CC) Control and freedom of choice are important to us, and we are prepared to pay real money for it. But things are not always that simple… ‘A la carte’ – a posh French phrase that implies something … Continue reading

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